Friday, February 01, 2008

Bayblab Podcast Episode 15

The new podcast is out. It's a staggering 1h long. Perhaps we should try doing more frequent but shorter podcasts. Any "fans" have suggestions Ben? Subject matter include: cloned meat, natural chemotherapeutics, stem cell transplant and amateur scientists. And don't miss Rob's plan to invade Australia, and why he thinks graduate students shouldn't become PIs.


6 comments:

Bayman said...

Nice job as usual AC. Fifteen episodes and finally we are starting to sound smarter. Maybe just because I'm sitting so far from the mic. Guess I'll try and bring my radio voice up to speed like Rob's for the next epi...

Joe D said...

Got it on the background, but had to come and rant. Perhaps it was just a slip of the tongue, but Wallace can hardly be described as an armchair naturalist. Amateur, perhaps. But he was not sat at home. Has nobody heard of the Wallace line? And the real story of Wallace's work is very relevant to what was being discussed: his studies were funded by his day job of selling dead animals to decorate rich people's country mansions.

Anonymous Coward said...

To be fair, I think Kamel drew a parallel to Wallace to show how future armchair biologists could do science while working on something else, thus not have to rely on grants. In a way, Wallace did science as a hobby, and financed it by selling specimens to rich collectors. So he didn't receive a pension for his contribution to science until much much later in his life, unlike say Darwin.

Bayman said...

Except in this case, collecting dead animals was also part of doing his science. Tricky. Thanks for follow-up JoeD.

kamel said...

Just another podcast follow-up re: the discussion about animal husbandry. I just got this email: "Liking the new podcast so far (I'm just about half way through). I think it was Rob who was wondering why they use males as the 'teasers' instead of females... you guys came up with some reasons and were close, but the real reason why is because the bulls have been selectively bred to be SO huge and SO strong that the female cows & heifers can no longer support them. So they breed these strong male steers who can support the weight."

Thanks JGarlough!

Bayman said...

Ha. Brilliant. Good to know. That will be a great dinner party/BBQ anecdote.